Views of historians – The Elizabethan Religious Settlement.

Research the views of historians on two issues.
1) The factors leading to the Religious Settlement of 1559
2) The consequences of the Religious Settlement of 1559
You must blog 5 of these views / assessments and make sure you name the historian with the appropriate quote. Try not to make the quote too long – it should be short, punchy and memorable!

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21 Responses to Views of historians – The Elizabethan Religious Settlement.

  1. Ruby Steer says:

    JOHN GUY
    Factor: “Elizabeth wished to avoid the iconoclasm of her brother’s reign”
    Factor: “Elizabeth’s diplomacy into the Protestant camp …did much to forge the link between Protestantism and national identity”

    PETER HOLMES
    Factor: “self-seeking nobility and monarchy”
    Factor: “the real opposition to Elizabeth (came from) the strong Catholic element in the House of Lords”
    Consequence: “Even by 1603 this process (the Reformation) was hardly complete”
    Consequence: (Elizabeth followed) “a more cautious religious policy than most of her advisers wanted.”

  2. Emma Marlein says:

    Factor: “There should be no doubt in Elizabeth’s personal Protestantism.”(Christopher Haigh)
    Consequence: “The nine lay votes against the Uniformity Bill were an embarrassment, especially as two came from the Privy Council.” (Christopher Haigh)
    Consequence: “If Elizabeth was a real protestant she would not have tolerated an idolatrous cross.” (Patrick Collinson)
    Consequence:”Deliberate interventions led her to blunt the Protestantism of her governments original programme.” (Christopher Haigh)

  3. Jack Rowson says:

    Factor: “There should be no doubt in Elizabeth’s personal Protestantism, her private prayers were protestant.” (Christopher Haigh)
    Consequence: Protestants exiled during Mary’s reign returned to England and captured the initiative in the Commons, forming an outspoken and influential ‘Puritan Choir’.(J.E. Neale)
    Consequence:It is the strangest paradox of her reign and the supreme tribute to her greatness (J.E. Neale)
    Consequence: claims that the provinces in particular remained Catholic as the Protestant religion failed to provide spiritual nourishment.(Christopher Haigh)

  4. Lucy Norton says:

    FACTOR: “The new monarch would have to be the partisan leader, with her feet placed firmly in the Protestant or Catholic Camp” (Michael A.R. Graves)
    FACTOR: “there can be little doubt of Elizabeth’s personal Protestantism” (Christopher Haigh)
    CONSEQUENCE: “Elizabeth obtained what she sought without either abandoning most of it or causing a civil war.” (Norman L. Jones)
    CONSEQUENCE: “communion service was made a little more like that of Edward’s first Prayer Book. By this compromise Elizabeth hoped to win over the Catholics” (Sinclair Aitkins)

  5. Ross Hunter says:

    CONSEQUENCE: It mollified the conservatives without incensing the more radical Protestants” (John Guy)
    FACTOR: “Royal supremacy was less controversial than Protestant uniformity” (John Guy)
    CONSEQUENCE: Calvinist’s believed Elizabeth brought “halfly reformed” policies.(Mary Crane)
    FACTOR: Elizabeth was “as Protestant as Jewel, Grindal or Cox” (Norman Jones)
    FACTOR: Elizabeth remained fairly conservative but the pressure of the returning Protestants, as with “Puritan Choir” influenced her religious settlement. (J.E.Neale)

  6. Daniel Fletcher says:

    FACTORS:
    “A Protestant-inclined House of Commons pushed Elizabeth further than she meant to go” (J.E. Neale)
    “There can be little doubt about Elizabeth’s personal Protestantism” (Christopher Haigh)
    “All the evidence of Elizabeth’s behaviour in the first months of her reign shows that she feared the power of Catholicism” (David Starkey)

    CONSEQUENCES:
    “Radical Protestant representatives struggled for a more aggressive reform” (J. E. Neale)

  7. Jake Dalby says:

    Factor: (J.E Neale) – “it was influenced by Protestant pressure applied by Puritans returning from abroad and that Elizabeth herself favoured the conservative methods”
    Factor: (Christopher Haigh) – “There can be little doubt about Elizabeth’s personal Protestantism”
    Factor: (David Starkey) – “All the evidence of Elizabeth’s behaviour in the first months of her reign shows that she feared the power of Catholicism”
    Consequence: (Christopher Haigh) – “even by the end of the century, prolonged clerical efforts had succeeded in creating a Protestant nation, but not a nation of Protestants”
    Consequence: (Peter Ackroyd) – “The injunctions were, in other words, an attempt to compose differences and to soften the acrimony and recrimination attendant on the further change in religion”

  8. Chris P. Bacon (Charles) says:

    Doran:
    ‘The Act of Supremacy gave Elizabeth the new title of Supreme Govenor of the Church of England. Although designed to placate the Catholics, the change also pleased some Protestants’
    Lockyer & O’Sullivan:
    ‘it was a successful hybrid’

    Warren:
    ‘Elizabeth was not a convenient person, and no such statement (on her personal religious views) exists’

  9. Jack Rowson says:

    Factor
    Lotherington maintains that there were no guarantees that there would be a return to Protestantism.
    Factor
    J.E. Neale said that she wanted a return to Henrician Catholicism without the Pope, and it was the return of exiles that made it more radical, i.e. a ‘Church of England’.
    Factor
    Regan sides with Jones quite a lot. He says that the Settlement does reflect quite closely Elizabeth’s own religious views.She wanted to create a church where as many believers as possible would be able to find salvation.
    Consequence
    N Jones argued that it was the result of a struggle between the House of Lords, the Queen, council, and the Bishops. He says the settlement was a triumph for the Queen.
    Consequence
    Christopher Haigh claims that the provinces in particular remained Catholic as the Protestant religion failed to provide spiritual nourishment.

  10. Oliver Harrison says:

    FACTOR: (Pollard) “Elizabeth wanted to design a church according to her wishes.”
    FACTOR: (Neale) “she wanted a return to Henrician Catholicism without the Pope, and it was the return of exiles that made it more radical, i.e. a ‘Church of England’.”
    CONSEQUENCE: (Foxe – Acts and Monuments) “Pushed through parliament a protestant religious settlement against the opposition of Catholics.”
    CONSEQUENCE: (Neale – Elizabeth and her parliament) “Result of a conservative Queen being forced into a more radical religious settlement by protestants in the House if Commons”
    CONSEQUENCES: (Jones – In faith by statute) “Elizabeth established a religious settlement that reflected her own religious view”

  11. Gene Simmons says:

    Factor: Christopher Haigh “There can be little doubt about Elizabeth’s personal Protestantism, as she had been raised in the Protestant household of Catherine Parr and had been taught by John Cheke, who had reformist tendencies”
    Factor: J.E.Neal: “A Protestant-inclined House of Commons pushed Elizabeth further than she meant to go”.

  12. Joe says:

    FACTOR: “Protestant inclined House of Commons pushed Elizabeth further than she meant” (Neale)
    FACTOR: “Opposition from Catholic Bishops in House of Lords whose resistance had to be overcome” (Jones)
    FACTOR:”Needed to minimise risk of revolt” (Dawson)
    CONSEQUENCE: “There was little doubt of Elizabeth’s personal Protestantism” (Haigh)
    CONSEQUENCE: “Elizabeth’s settlement had settled nothing” (Haigh)

  13. Kerry Fletcher says:

    Factor
    “valued political peace rather than religious correctness” (Peter Holmes)
    “There can be little doubt of Elizabeth’s personal Protestantism (Chistopher Haigh)
    “Her private prayers were protestant” (Chritopher Haigh)
    Consequences:
    “More cautious religious policy that most of her advisers wanted” (Peter Holmes)

  14. lucysimmonds says:

    Factor:
    John Guy – ” Elizabeth’s diplomacy into the Protestant camp… did much to forge the link between Protestantism and national identity”
    J.E Neale – ” A protestant inclined House of Commons pushed Elizabeth further than she meant to go”

    Consequence:
    Christopher Haigh – “The nine lay votes against the Uniformity Bill were an embarrassment, especially as two came from the Privy Council”
    Norman L Jones – ” Elizabeth obtained what she sought without either abandoning most of it or causing a civil war”
    J. E Neale – ” It is the strangest paradox of her reign and the supreme tributes to her greatness”

  15. hannahlinaker says:

    HOLMES:
    1. “The religious settlement of Elizabeth was the biggest impact on Englands religion since Martin Luther in 1519”
    2. “The precise nature of Elizabeth’s religious opinions is much debated.”
    3. “[Elizabeth] valued political peace rather than religious correctness.”
    4. “Elizabeth attended chapel every day because it was her religious duty, rather than because she was devout like Philp or Mary.”

  16. Bethan Griffiths says:

    NEALE: ‘Elizabeth was never a protestant in the fully reformed (or Calvinist) idiom of the Marian exiles and that she had been forced to accept a more radical religious settlement than she would have preferred
    HAIGH: ‘There should be no doubt in Elizabeth’s personal Protestantism.’
    GRAVES: ‘The new monarch would have to be the partisan leader, with her feet placed firmly in the protestant or catholic camp.’
    GUY: ‘Royal supremacy was less controversial than Protestant uniformity.’
    NEALE again: ‘A Protestant inclined House of Commons pushed Elizabeth further than she meant to go.’
    STARKEY: ‘All the evidence of Elizabeth’s behaviour in the first months of the reign shows that she feared the power of Catholicism.’

  17. Megan Foster says:

    “Her private prayers were protestant” (Haigh)
    “Elizabeth’s personal protestantism” (Haigh)
    “A Protestant inclined House of Commons pushed Elizabeth further than she meant to go” (Neale)

  18. jlittlechild says:

    “A Protestant inclined House of Commons pushed Elizabeth further than she meant to go” – Neale
    “Elizabeth valued political peace rather than religious correctness” – Holmes
    ” Calvinists thought Elizabeth brought halfly reformed policies” – Crane
    “There should be no doubt in Elizabeth’s personal Protestantism” – Haigh
    “Even by 1603 the reformation was hardly complete” Holmes

  19. Joe Ellerker says:

    NEALE “Protestant inclined House of Commons pushed Elizabeth further than she meant”
    JONES “Opposition from Catholic Bishops in House of Lords whose resistance had to be overcome”
    DAWSON “Needed to minimise risk of revolt”
    HAIGH ” Little doubt of Elizabeth’s personal Protestantism ”
    HAIGH “Elizabeth’s settlement had settled nothing”

  20. Anton says:

    Factor:
    John Guy – ” Elizabeth’s diplomacy into the Protestant camp… did much to forge the link between Protestantism and national identity”
    J.E Neale – ” A protestant inclined House of Commons pushed Elizabeth further than she meant to go”

    Consequence:
    Christopher Haigh – “The nine lay votes against the Uniformity Bill were an embarrassment, especially as two came from the Privy Council”
    Norman L Jones – ” Elizabeth obtained what she sought without either abandoning most of it or causing a civil war”
    J. E Neale – ” It is the strangest paradox of her reign and the supreme tributes to her greatness”

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